Adoption Process in Africa

International African adoptions may take between one and four years, depending on the approval of paperwork and home visits, according to the U. S. Department of State Office of Children's Issues. The United States has stringent requirements both before and after the adoption to help the adoptive families, children and African governments be happy and content with their decisions.

Instructions

Things You'll Need:

  • FBI fingerprints
  • Child abuse clearance
  • I-600 A/orange form
  • I-600/blue form
  • Criminal background check
  • Birth certificate
  • Marriage license or divorce decree
  • Pre-Adoption

1. Consult with an adoption agency to determine if your family is eligible to adopt a child from Africa. Prospective parents must meet their state's requirements and pass a criminal background check. Adoptive parents must be at least 25, if single. A married couple must jointly adopt a child from Africa, even if they are separated, according to the Office of Children's Issues. One parent must be a U.S. citizen by birth or naturalization because green card residents are not permitted to adopt internationally.

2. Submit a copy of birth certificates belonging to you and your spouse, marriage license and/or divorce degree to the adoption agency or U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS), says Americans for African Adoptions (AFAA). Provide FBI fingerprints and child abuse clearance for every household member older than 18. You or the adoption agency must also submit forms 1-600 A/orange and I-600/blue.

3. Contact a licensed home study adoption agency from your state. Submit the home study report within six months to the adoption agency or CIS with other forms and clearences.

4. Research the child's home African country. Educate yourself on topics including international adoptions, adopting children of a different race and adopting older children. Contact adoption support groups and conferences, other adoptive parents, African students attending local colleges and African magazines and periodicals to learn more.

Post-Adoption

1. Ask the adoption agency to assist you in obtaining citizenship documents for your child. The child must be in legal custody of an American citizen, must be admitted to the United States as a lawful, permanent resident and the adoption must be final, according to the Office of Children's Issues.

2. Meet with a social worker three, six and 12 months after adoption for post-adoption report preparation. These reports are required by African governments to assure the child is receiving appropriate care in the United States, according to the Office of Children's Issues. Delaying social workers and reports will result in holdups for other African adoptions, according to AFAA.

3. Self-prepare annual post-adoption reports after the African child has been in your home for one year, according to AFAA. Include multiple close-up pictures of the child until he reaches 18 to prove to his home country's government that he is well cared for. Submit reports to the adoption agency near the yearly anniversary of the adoption, according to AFAA. The Office of Children's Issues recommends adopting from a different country if the reporting commitment is too strenuous.

Select A Country In Africa

Adopting a Child from Zambia

Zambia is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention e...
 
Adopting a Child from Swaziland

Swaziland is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Conventio...
 
Adopting a Child from South Africa

South Africa is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption(Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore all adoptions between South Africa a...
 
Adopting a Child from Sierra Leone

To bring an adopted child to United States from Sierra Leone, you must be found eligible to be an adoptive parent by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determ...
 
Adopting a Child from Seychelles

Seychelles is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption(Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore all adoptions between Seychelles and t...
 
Adopting a Child from Mali

Mali is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption(Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore all adoptions between Mali and the United St...
 
Adopting a Child from Ivory Coast

Cote d’Ivoire is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Conve...

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