Charlottesville: Racist graffiti in streets after rally

by 13/08/2017 18:57:00 0 comments 1 Views
  • A white supremacist rally left one woman dead and hospitalized others in Charlottesville, Virginia, Saturday
  • The violence began before a Unite the Right rally, protesting the removal of a statue at Emancipation Park
  • White nationalists, neo-Nazis and alt-right groups brawled with counter-protesters in the streets
  • The chaos escalated when a  Dodge Challenger slammed into a group of people later that day
  • Although the crowds have left, racist chalk messages and controversial signage litter the streets of the city
  • Now, the community is trying to come together in unity and pay tribute to the victims of the attack  

By Cheyenne Roundtree For Dailymail.com

Published: 14:22 EDT, 13 August 2017 | Updated: 18:57 EDT, 13 August 2017

After a violent white supremacist rally left one woman dead and dozens others injured in Charlottesville, the Virginia city sat quiet in the wake of the tragic events, with debris and racist messages littering the streets.

Alt-right groups clashed with counter-protesters throughout the day on Saturday, beginning early in the morning at a planned Unite the Right rally held at Emancipation Park.

Men in militia gear marched the streets, neo-Nazis waved flags and white supremacists all gathered to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, but erupted into brawls before the rally started. 

The violence only subdued after a Dodge Challenger rammed into a crowd of peaceful counter- protesters later that afternoon, killing Heather Heyer, 32, and sending at least 19 people to the hospital for their injuries.

Although the crowds have dispersed, they left reminders of the destructive day including racist chalk messages, controversial signage and debris covering grassy parks, seen at the scene on Sunday.

Now, the southern city is trying to come together after chaos erupted and ease the day's painful memories by leaving colorful flowers to pay tribute to the victims and praying together at churches.

The violent protests held in Charlottesville erupted into chaos on Saturday, leaving one woman dead. The Virginia city sat quiet in the wake of the tragic events, with debris and racist graffiti littering the streets on Sunday. Pictured: Chalk spells out 'KKK' on the sidewalk outside of Emancipation Park
The violent protests held in Charlottesville erupted into chaos on Saturday, leaving one woman dead. The Virginia city sat quiet in the wake of the tragic events, with debris and racist graffiti littering the streets on Sunday. Pictured: Chalk spells out 'KKK' on the sidewalk outside of Emancipation Park

The violent protests held in Charlottesville erupted into chaos on Saturday, leaving one woman dead. The Virginia city sat quiet in the wake of the tragic events, with debris and racist graffiti littering the streets on Sunday. Pictured: Chalk spells out 'KKK' on the sidewalk outside of Emancipation Park

A day after the destructive events, signage from white nationalists, neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan and members of the 'alt-right' were still in the park. Pictured: The left behind signs reads 'The wish media is going down' and 'We support President Trump'
A day after the destructive events, signage from white nationalists, neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan and members of the 'alt-right' were still in the park. Pictured: The left behind signs reads 'The wish media is going down' and 'We support President Trump'

A day after the destructive events, signage from white nationalists, neo-Nazis, the Ku Klux Klan and members of the 'alt-right' were still in the park. Pictured: The left behind signs reads 'The wish media is going down' and 'We support President Trump'

Groups were gathered to protest the removal of this statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. An alt-right blogger organized the event, which was expected to bring out more than 4,000 people
Groups were gathered to protest the removal of this statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. An alt-right blogger organized the event, which was expected to bring out more than 4,000 people

Groups were gathered to protest the removal of this statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. An alt-right blogger organized the event, which was expected to bring out more than 4,000 people

However, violence escalated before the rally even began at noon, with the state calling it an unlawful assembly around 11am. Police in riot gear used tear gas to evacuate the unruly crowd. Pictured: Chalk that reads: 'God bless Gen. Lee' 
However, violence escalated before the rally even began at noon, with the state calling it an unlawful assembly around 11am. Police in riot gear used tear gas to evacuate the unruly crowd. Pictured: Chalk that reads: 'God bless Gen. Lee' 

However, violence escalated before the rally even began at noon, with the state calling it an unlawful assembly around 11am. Police in riot gear used tear gas to evacuate the unruly crowd. Pictured: Chalk that reads: 'God bless Gen. Lee' 

The event drew national attention, with journalists and media crews flocking to the scene. Pictured: Television camera cables run over marks where balloons filled with paint were thrown at white nationalists
The event drew national attention, with journalists and media crews flocking to the scene. Pictured: Television camera cables run over marks where balloons filled with paint were thrown at white nationalists

The event drew national attention, with journalists and media crews flocking to the scene. Pictured: Television camera cables run over marks where balloons filled with paint were thrown at white nationalists

Violence erupted after counter-protesters also attended the rally. Footage from the scene shows the groups facing off, some screaming at each other before punches were thrown. A sign reads: 'Diversity means chasing down the last white person'
Violence erupted after counter-protesters also attended the rally. Footage from the scene shows the groups facing off, some screaming at each other before punches were thrown. A sign reads: 'Diversity means chasing down the last white person'

Violence erupted after counter-protesters also attended the rally. Footage from the scene shows the groups facing off, some screaming at each other before punches were thrown. A sign reads: 'Diversity means chasing down the last white person'

Racist messages in chalk remain on the sidewalks in Emancipation Park the day after the Unite the Right rally devolved into violence. A portion of the message reads: 'Get the reds out!' 
Racist messages in chalk remain on the sidewalks in Emancipation Park the day after the Unite the Right rally devolved into violence. A portion of the message reads: 'Get the reds out!' 

Racist messages in chalk remain on the sidewalks in Emancipation Park the day after the Unite the Right rally devolved into violence. A portion of the message reads: 'Get the reds out!' 

Charlottesville is recovering from the tragic events and is trying to come together as a community. A downtown sign reads: 'If equality and diversity aren't for you then neither are we... Minority rights are human rights'
Charlottesville is recovering from the tragic events and is trying to come together as a community. A downtown sign reads: 'If equality and diversity aren't for you then neither are we... Minority rights are human rights'

Charlottesville is recovering from the tragic events and is trying to come together as a community. A downtown sign reads: 'If equality and diversity aren't for you then neither are we... Minority rights are human rights'

The violence only subdued after a Dodge Challenger rammed into a group of peaceful counter-protesters in the afternoon, killing Heather Heyes, 32, and injuring at least 19 more. People gathered on Sunday to pay tribute to the victims (pictured) 
The violence only subdued after a Dodge Challenger rammed into a group of peaceful counter-protesters in the afternoon, killing Heather Heyes, 32, and injuring at least 19 more. People gathered on Sunday to pay tribute to the victims (pictured) 

The violence only subdued after a Dodge Challenger rammed into a group of peaceful counter-protesters in the afternoon, killing Heather Heyes, 32, and injuring at least 19 more. People gathered on Sunday to pay tribute to the victims (pictured) 

The people of the Virginia city have been laying down flowers on Fourth Street between Main and Water, where Saturday's 'senseless' attack took place
The people of the Virginia city have been laying down flowers on Fourth Street between Main and Water, where Saturday's 'senseless' attack took place

The people of the Virginia city have been laying down flowers on Fourth Street between Main and Water, where Saturday's 'senseless' attack took place

People are coming together in the wake of the tragic day. Pictured: Worshipers hold hands during morning services at Mount Zion First African Baptist Church on Sunday
People are coming together in the wake of the tragic day. Pictured: Worshipers hold hands during morning services at Mount Zion First African Baptist Church on Sunday

People are coming together in the wake of the tragic day. Pictured: Worshipers hold hands during morning services at Mount Zion First African Baptist Church on Sunday

Women hug as they bring flowers to be placed at the corner of Fourth Street and Water Street, where a Dodge Challenger plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters 
Women hug as they bring flowers to be placed at the corner of Fourth Street and Water Street, where a Dodge Challenger plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters 

Women hug as they bring flowers to be placed at the corner of Fourth Street and Water Street, where a Dodge Challenger plowed into a crowd of counter-protesters 

People also paid their respects to the two police officers who died when a  Virginia State Police helicopter crashed within city limits
People also paid their respects to the two police officers who died when a  Virginia State Police helicopter crashed within city limits

People also paid their respects to the two police officers who died when a Virginia State Police helicopter crashed within city limits

The downtown part of the city gets back to normal after a fatal crash at the Unite the Right rally on Saturday 
The downtown part of the city gets back to normal after a fatal crash at the Unite the Right rally on Saturday 

The downtown part of the city gets back to normal after a fatal crash at the Unite the Right rally on Saturday 

The woman who was mowed down and killed at a hate-fueled white supremacist march in Virginia was identified as Heather Heyer. She was protesting the rally when James Alex Fields Jr allegedly plowed his vehicle into the crowd, killing her and injuring 19 others
The woman who was mowed down and killed at a hate-fueled white supremacist march in Virginia was identified as Heather Heyer. She was protesting the rally when James Alex Fields Jr allegedly plowed his vehicle into the crowd, killing her and injuring 19 others

The woman who was mowed down and killed at a hate-fueled white supremacist march in Virginia was identified as Heather Heyer. She was protesting the rally when James Alex Fields Jr allegedly plowed his vehicle into the crowd, killing her and injuring 19 others

People have been laying down flowers on 4th st between Main and Water, where yesterday's attack took place
People have been laying down flowers on 4th st between Main and Water, where yesterday's attack took place
Heyer's mother, who has not been name, wrote of her daughter: 'She died doing what was right. My heart is broken, but I am forever proud of her
Heyer's mother, who has not been name, wrote of her daughter: 'She died doing what was right. My heart is broken, but I am forever proud of her

Heyer's mother, who has not been named, wrote of her daughter: 'She died doing what was right. My heart is broken, but I am forever proud of her. Pictured: Women crying at the scene (left) and a card left with flowers (right) 

Charlottesville Police Chief Alfred Thomas Jr. told reporters Heyer was killed while crossing the street after Fields Jr allegedly plowed his Dodge Challenger into the protesters
Charlottesville Police Chief Alfred Thomas Jr. told reporters Heyer was killed while crossing the street after Fields Jr allegedly plowed his Dodge Challenger into the protesters

Charlottesville Police Chief Alfred Thomas Jr. told reporters Heyer was killed while crossing the street after Fields Jr allegedly plowed his Dodge Challenger into the protesters

Late Saturday night, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions said racial bigotry and hatred 'cannot be tolerated'
Late Saturday night, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions said racial bigotry and hatred 'cannot be tolerated'

Late Saturday night, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions said racial bigotry and hatred 'cannot be tolerated'

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe holds hands and prays with Dr. Alvin Edwards, pastor of Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church. McAuliffe addressed the congregation the day after violence erupted around the Unite the Right rally
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe holds hands and prays with Dr. Alvin Edwards, pastor of Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church. McAuliffe addressed the congregation the day after violence erupted around the Unite the Right rally

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe holds hands and prays with Dr. Alvin Edwards, pastor of Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church. McAuliffe addressed the congregation the day after violence erupted around the Unite the Right rally

McAuliffe had strongly condemned all of the so-called 'patriotic' white nationalists during a press conference Saturday evening. 'Go home. You are not wanted in this great commonwealth,' McAuliffe proclaimed. 'You are not patriots. You came here today to hurt people and that is not patriotic' 
McAuliffe had strongly condemned all of the so-called 'patriotic' white nationalists during a press conference Saturday evening. 'Go home. You are not wanted in this great commonwealth,' McAuliffe proclaimed. 'You are not patriots. You came here today to hurt people and that is not patriotic' 

McAuliffe had strongly condemned all of the so-called 'patriotic' white nationalists during a press conference Saturday evening. 'Go home. You are not wanted in this great commonwealth,' McAuliffe proclaimed. 'You are not patriots. You came here today to hurt people and that is not patriotic' 

A candlelight vigil at the White House is scheduled for 8.30pm, and a Vigil for Justice will be held a few hours prior to that at the World War II Memorial at the National Mall. Rallies, vigils and other events are also being held in Los Angeles, Seattle, San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Denver, New York City and Chicago. Pictured: The congregation at Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church
A candlelight vigil at the White House is scheduled for 8.30pm, and a Vigil for Justice will be held a few hours prior to that at the World War II Memorial at the National Mall. Rallies, vigils and other events are also being held in Los Angeles, Seattle, San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Denver, New York City and Chicago. Pictured: The congregation at Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church

A candlelight vigil at the White House is scheduled for 8.30pm, and a Vigil for Justice will be held a few hours prior to that at the World War II Memorial at the National Mall. Rallies, vigils and other events are also being held in Los Angeles, Seattle, San Francisco, Pittsburgh, Denver, New York City and Chicago. Pictured: The congregation at Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church

McAuliffe (center) observes a moment of silence with Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam and Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring during a worship service at Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church on Sunday
McAuliffe (center) observes a moment of silence with Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam and Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring during a worship service at Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church on Sunday

McAuliffe (center) observes a moment of silence with Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam and Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring during a worship service at Mt. Zion First African Baptist Church on Sunday

President Trump admonished the day, saying in a press conference: 'We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, violence, on many sides... The hate and division must stop, and must stop right now'
President Trump admonished the day, saying in a press conference: 'We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, violence, on many sides... The hate and division must stop, and must stop right now'

President Trump admonished the day, saying in a press conference: 'We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry, violence, on many sides... The hate and division must stop, and must stop right now'

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