Has Kim Jong-Un tested another nuclear bomb?

by 12/10/2017 20:18:00 0 comments 1 Views
  • Small earthquake detected in North Korea near where nuclear tests conducted
  • US Geological Survey said 2.9 magnitude quake recorded near Sungjibaegam
  • It explained the event occurred in the area of the previous regime nuclear tests

By Iain Burns For Mailonline

Published: 14:07 EDT, 12 October 2017 | Updated: 15:40 EDT, 12 October 2017

A small earthquake has been detected in North Korea in the same part of the country where previous nuclear tests were conducted.

The United States Geological Survey said the 2.9 magnitude earthquake was recorded 14 miles northeast of Sungjibaegam.

It explained: 'This event occurred in the area of the previous North Korean Nuclear tests. 

'The event has earthquake like characteristics, however, we cannot conclusively confirm at this time the nature (natural or human-made) of the event.'   

The United States Geological Survey said the 2.9 magnitude earthquake was recorded 14 miles northeast of Sungjibaegam. Pictured: North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, second from right, at an undisclosed location inspecting a hydrogen bomb
The United States Geological Survey said the 2.9 magnitude earthquake was recorded 14 miles northeast of Sungjibaegam. Pictured: North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, second from right, at an undisclosed location inspecting a hydrogen bomb

The United States Geological Survey said the 2.9 magnitude earthquake was recorded 14 miles northeast of Sungjibaegam. Pictured: North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, second from right, at an undisclosed location inspecting a hydrogen bomb

The United States Geological Survey explained: 'This event occurred in the area of the previous North Korean Nuclear tests. 'The event has earthquake like characteristics, however, we cannot conclusively confirm at this time the nature (natural or human-made) of the event'
The United States Geological Survey explained: 'This event occurred in the area of the previous North Korean Nuclear tests. 'The event has earthquake like characteristics, however, we cannot conclusively confirm at this time the nature (natural or human-made) of the event'

The United States Geological Survey explained: 'This event occurred in the area of the previous North Korean Nuclear tests. 'The event has earthquake like characteristics, however, we cannot conclusively confirm at this time the nature (natural or human-made) of the event'

Pictured: North Korea's intermediate-range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 lifting off from the launching pad at an undisclosed location near Pyongyang in August. The regime has claimed to have a miniaturised nuclear warhead capable of being attached to a missile
Pictured: North Korea's intermediate-range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 lifting off from the launching pad at an undisclosed location near Pyongyang in August. The regime has claimed to have a miniaturised nuclear warhead capable of being attached to a missile

Pictured: North Korea's intermediate-range strategic ballistic rocket Hwasong-12 lifting off from the launching pad at an undisclosed location near Pyongyang in August. The regime has claimed to have a miniaturised nuclear warhead capable of being attached to a missile

The earthquake was described as being 'shallow', with a depth of just over three miles. 

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said earlier today that the Trump administration thinks the threat posed by North Korea's nuclear weapons is currently manageable but Pyongyang cannot be allowed to develop the ability to strike the US homeland.

'A state that has developed a pretty good ICBM (missile) capability and is developing a pretty good nuclear re-entry vehicle, I would believe ... that that state simply cannot have the ability to reach the homeland,' Kelly said.

'Right now we think the threat is manageable but over time if it grows beyond where it is today, well, let's hope that diplomacy works,' said Kelly, a retired Marine Corps general.  

In September the Stalinist regime detonated a hydrogen bomb sparking a powerful 6.3 magnitude earthquake amid an escalating nuclear crisis. Pictured: The dictator laughs during a missile launch
In September the Stalinist regime detonated a hydrogen bomb sparking a powerful 6.3 magnitude earthquake amid an escalating nuclear crisis. Pictured: The dictator laughs during a missile launch

In September the Stalinist regime detonated a hydrogen bomb sparking a powerful 6.3 magnitude earthquake amid an escalating nuclear crisis. Pictured: The dictator laughs during a missile launch

The totalitarian regime's previous nuclear tests have resulted in much stronger earthquakes than today's, however, with all of them being higher than 4.3 magnitude.  

In September the Stalinist regime detonated a hydrogen bomb that sparked a powerful 6.3 magnitude quake.

Its five other tests occurred in 2006, 2009, 2013 and two in 2016.

The earthquakes caused by the tests have risen in strength with each detonation - from 4.3, 4.7, 5.1 (twice) to 5.3 and finally 6.3.

Wide reach: North Korea is currently working on increasing the range of its rockets to 5,592miles which could see it reach several cities on the US coast and Canada - the red line appears uneven due to the map being flattened out
Wide reach: North Korea is currently working on increasing the range of its rockets to 5,592miles which could see it reach several cities on the US coast and Canada - the red line appears uneven due to the map being flattened out

Wide reach: North Korea is currently working on increasing the range of its rockets to 5,592miles which could see it reach several cities on the US coast and Canada - the red line appears uneven due to the map being flattened out

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said earlier today that the Trump administration thinks the threat posed by North Korea's nuclear weapons is currently manageable but Pyongyang cannot be allowed to develop the ability to strike the US homeland. Pictured: Artillery fires during North Korea's 'largest-ever' artillery drill in spring 
White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said earlier today that the Trump administration thinks the threat posed by North Korea's nuclear weapons is currently manageable but Pyongyang cannot be allowed to develop the ability to strike the US homeland. Pictured: Artillery fires during North Korea's 'largest-ever' artillery drill in spring 

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said earlier today that the Trump administration thinks the threat posed by North Korea's nuclear weapons is currently manageable but Pyongyang cannot be allowed to develop the ability to strike the US homeland. Pictured: Artillery fires during North Korea's 'largest-ever' artillery drill in spring 

The terrifying 6.3 magnitude tremor in September was detected in the northeast of the country where the Punggye-ri test site is located - but was so strong that it shook buildings in China and Russia.

State television claimed the country's sixth nuclear test - 10 times more powerful than its fifth - was a 'perfect success' on September 3 and could pave the way for a frightening new range of missiles loaded with hydrogen bombs.

It added that the underground test - which was directly ordered by leader Kim Jong-un - was a 'meaningful' step in completing the country's nuclear weapons programme. 

Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson condemned the 'reckless' nuclear weapon test and stressed that 'all options are on the table' when pressed on military action.

But he warned: 'The distance between North Korea and Seoul is very very small - they could basically vaporise large parts of the South Korean population even with conventional weapons.'

Following the blast US president Donald Trump slammed North Korea as a 'rogue nation' which is a 'great threat and embarrassment to China' - finishing with the thinly-veiled threat: 'They only understand one thing.'

He wrote on Twitter: 'North Korea has conducted a major Nuclear Test. Their words and actions continue to be very hostile and dangerous to the United States.

'North Korea is a rogue nation which has become a great threat and embarrassment to China, which is trying to help but with little success.

'South Korea is finding, as I have told them, that their talk of appeasement with North Korea will not work, they only understand one thing!'  

It comes after news today that the United Arab Emirates will stop issuing new visas to North Korean workers, becoming the latest Gulf country to limit Pyongyang's ability to evade sanctions and raise money abroad amid tensions with the US.

A statement by the UAE Foreign Ministry did not address the hundreds of North Korean laborers already working in the Emirates. A call to the UAE's Embassy in Washington was not immediately returned.

The statement said the UAE would pull its non-resident ambassador to North Korea as well as stop North Koreans from opening new businesses in the Emirates, a federation of seven sheikhdoms on the Arabian Peninsula that is a staunch U.S. ally.

The UAE 'looks forward to a unified global front against North Korea's nuclear weapons and missile program,' the statement read.

It's not clear what prompted the decision, though American officials have been pressuring their allies in the Gulf Arab states to cut back on economic ties to North Korea. The US Embassy in Abu Dhabi did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Last month, Kuwait announced it would expel North Korea's ambassador to the oil-rich country and four other diplomats, as well as limit visas. North Korea's Embassy in Kuwait City serves as its only diplomatic outpost in the Gulf. Qatar has said 'less than 1,000' North Koreans are in the country and their visas will not be renewed. North Korean laborers also are in Oman.

The US and Asian nations have increased pressure on their allies to cut ties as Pyongyang has tested a nuclear weapon and launched ballistic missiles over Japan.    

More to follow...

No tags for this article