eHarmony research reveals what people do in a relationship

by 07/12/2017 19:09:00 0 comments 1 Views
  • New research revealed the milestones couples reach during their relationship 
  • eHarmony asked over 1,034 Australians when relationship events take place 
  • There are a lot of commonalities for Australians and their dating lives

By Billie Schwab Dunn For Daily Mail Australia

Published: 18:48 EST, 7 December 2017 | Updated: 19:09 EST, 7 December 2017

In the lead up to holiday season, where 22 per cent of singles feel the loneliest, new research from online dating site eHarmony has revealed the milestones couples reach throughout their relationship. 

The website asked more than 1,000 Australians to reveal when major relationship events unfold – from the first kiss to making things 'Facebook official'.

'There are a lot of commonalities among Australians when it comes to the important phases we go through in our dating journey,' Harmony Relationship Expert and Psychologist Jacqui Manning said.

'While some are more fun than others, it’s crucial not to rush through any phase – take the time to actually be single and enjoy the dating experience, not just the final destination.'

Dating website eHarmony asked over 1,034 Australians to reveal when major relationship events unfold – from the first kiss to making things 'Facebook official'
Dating website eHarmony asked over 1,034 Australians to reveal when major relationship events unfold – from the first kiss to making things 'Facebook official'

Dating website eHarmony asked over 1,034 Australians to reveal when major relationship events unfold – from the first kiss to making things 'Facebook official'

THE 'SPARK' PHASE

According to the findings, Australians tend to get physical fast in the early days of dating, with one in four sharing a kiss on the first date.

This being said, one in 10 said that they would wait over three weeks before they pashed their date and the national average is to wait a month.

The research also revealed that Australians don't rush into sleeping with someone, with the majority waiting three months before they make the move.

On the other hand, nine per cent of people opt to sleep with someone on the same day or within the week of meeting them.

Some may not be surprised that the research shows that men are more keen to get into the sack, with one in four Aussie males open to sex within the first week of dating someone new, compared to only one in 10 females who said the same.

Generally speaking Australian women, 25 per cent to be exact, prefer to wait at least a month or more before getting between the sheets.

According to the research findings Australians tend to get physical fast in the early days of dating, with one in four sharing a kiss on the first date
According to the research findings Australians tend to get physical fast in the early days of dating, with one in four sharing a kiss on the first date

According to the research findings Australians tend to get physical fast in the early days of dating, with one in four sharing a kiss on the first date

THE HONEYMOON PHASE 

Unfortunately Australians have differing opinions on what leads a couple to becoming monogamous, which is why this stage of a relationship can often leave people confused.

One in three believe you need to have 'the talk' or 'ask' in order to become exclusive and another third said that they rely on 'gut feeling' alone.

Although Aussies are willing to commit to their partners, on average it takes people three months to deactivate their online dating profiles.

Surprisingly men are more likely to do so than women, with 28 per cent of men deactivating their account three weeks after meeting their partner, compared to 17 percent of women.

These days one of the main ways couples share their new romance is by sharing a photo online, which 29 per cent do after four months. 

The average person only waits six months before farting in front of their partner, which is only a month longer than people wait to keep a toothbrush at their lovers house
The average person only waits six months before farting in front of their partner, which is only a month longer than people wait to keep a toothbrush at their lovers house

The average person only waits six months before farting in front of their partner, which is only a month longer than people wait to keep a toothbrush at their lovers house

THE INTIMACY PHASE  

DATING SNAPSHOT 

· One in three Aussies still believe you need to have 'the talk' or 'ask' in order to become monogamous (31%)

· People wait on average three months to deactivate their online dating profiles after meeting their partner

· Aussies wait on average four months to share a snap of themselves with their partner on social media (29%)

· Men are far quicker to say 'I love you', with half (50%) saying it in the first three months

· The average person only waits a month longer to break wind in front of their new love (6 months) than they wait to keep a toothbrush at their house (5 months) 

Australian couples take three months to utter those three little words.

Interestingly, men are far quicker to say 'I love you' than woman are, with one in two admitting they’ll say it within the first three months and only one in three women doing the same.

The research has also revealed that Aussie couples truly do feel comfortable with each other as the relationship blossoms.

The average person only waits six months before farting in front of their partner, which is only a month longer than people wait to keep a toothbrush at their lovers house.

The study showed that the younger generations, those under 24, are far less self-conscious when it comes to bodily functions, with one in two admitting they're happy to pass gas within the first three months of a new relationship.

It is around the half-year mark people feel comfortable enough to be truly vulnerable with their significant other.

It takes five months for people to let their partner see them cry and two months for women to be around their partner with no make up on.

THE COMMITMENT PHASE  

While it may seem to some that the first few phases of a relationship move quickly, people are a lot slower when it comes to the next stages of commitment.

On average it takes 45 per cent of people a year to be engaged, 51 per cent a year to be married and 41 per cent of people wait a year before conceiving a child.

It is the same amount of time for those who buy a property together (45 per cent), or get a joint bank account (43 per cent).

That said, a 28 per cent of people would move in together, 13 per cent would get engaged and 15 per cent would go as far as to get a pet together in six months or less.

One in two Australians are happy to introduce their new partner to their mates within the first three months, but wait twice as long introduce them to family (64 per cent). 

On average it takes 45 per cent of people a year to be engaged, 51 per cent a year to be married and 41 per cent of people wait a year before conceiving a child 
On average it takes 45 per cent of people a year to be engaged, 51 per cent a year to be married and 41 per cent of people wait a year before conceiving a child 

On average it takes 45 per cent of people a year to be engaged, 51 per cent a year to be married and 41 per cent of people wait a year before conceiving a child 

THE HEARTBREAK PHASE  

Unfortunately many relationships come to an end, with 67 per cent of Australians waiting less than a year to heal their hearts and start dating other people.

Men are quicker to get back on the horse, with 72 per cent waiting less than a year, compared to 63 per cent of women. 

Millennials are even quicker to re-activate their dating profiles, with one in three willing to date less than a month after a break-up.

Despite jumping back into the dating scene, it still takes Australians an average of two years to get over their ex enough to start seriously dating someone new.  

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