Supersonic missile that is nearly impossible to intercept is developed for Israel Air Force

by 14/06/2018 08:11:00 0 comments 1 Views
  • The air-to-surface missile has been dubbed 'the Rampage' after a video game 
  • Its designers say the missile is cheaper than Israel's existing arsenal of weapons 
  • The Rampage is also more sophisticated as it's fitted with high-tech tracking 

By George Martin For Mailonline

Published: 07:45 EDT, 14 June 2018 | Updated: 08:11 EDT, 14 June 2018

Israel has developed a new supersonic missile which is nearly impossible to intercept as tensions in the near east continue to rise.

The air-to-surface missile, dubbed 'the Rampage' after a popular video game, was manufactured by Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) and Israel Military Industry Systems (IMI).

According to its makers, the powerful weapon is equipped with a warhead, rocket engine and advanced navigation suit which allows for precision targeting at a lower cost than the nation's existing arsenal.

The new 'Rampage' missile being launched from an Israeli F-15 fighter jet for testing purposes
The new 'Rampage' missile being launched from an Israeli F-15 fighter jet for testing purposes

The new 'Rampage' missile being launched from an Israeli F-15 fighter jet for testing purposes

Israel is stepping up its defence capabilities amid ongoing skirmishes with both Iranian and Palestinian militants
Israel is stepping up its defence capabilities amid ongoing skirmishes with both Iranian and Palestinian militants

Israel is stepping up its defence capabilities amid ongoing skirmishes with both Iranian and Palestinian militants

Amit Haimovich, a director at the IAI, told the Jerusalem Post: 'It can be detected, but it is very hard to intercept.

'If you take the Middle East arena and areas protected by air-defense systems, the whole point of this missile is that it can hit targets within standoff ranges without threatening the launching platform.'

The 4.7-meter-long missile weighs 570 kg and is intended for strikes on command centers, air force bases, infrastructures and valuable field targets protected by anti-aircraft batteries.

Israel's announcement of the new missile comes amid rising tensions with Iranian troops stationed in Syria and Palestinian militants on the Gaza border.

A video released by IMI shows a simulation of the missile destroying military targets at high speed
A video released by IMI shows a simulation of the missile destroying military targets at high speed

A video released by IMI shows a simulation of the missile destroying military targets at high speed

Israel and Iran have been at loggerheads since US President Donald Trump controversially backed out of the Iranian nuclear last month.

The two nations have been engaged in a series of heated battles on the border with Syria as Iranian troops fired several rocket salvos at Israeli military targets in the Golan Heights.

US-backed Israeli troops then reined down a furious missile attack on several Iranian outposts in Syria - reportedly resulting in hundreds of casualties.

Meanwhile Israel's military also struck 55 Palestinian targets in the Gaza Strip last month, including military compounds, sheds of drones used for terror purpose and training facilities.

Action was taken after Hamas militants fired 70 rockets and mortar bombs into Israel which injured three soldiers due to flying shrapnel.

A Palestinian stands near the destroyed Islamic Jihad military base in the Gaza strip after it was targeted by an Israeli warplane
A Palestinian stands near the destroyed Islamic Jihad military base in the Gaza strip after it was targeted by an Israeli warplane

A Palestinian stands near the destroyed Islamic Jihad military base in the Gaza strip after it was targeted by an Israeli warplane

A thick plume of smoke rising on the horizon of the Gaza city earlier   strikes on the territory drew to an eventual close
A thick plume of smoke rising on the horizon of the Gaza city earlier   strikes on the territory drew to an eventual close

A thick plume of smoke rising on the horizon of the Gaza city earlier strikes on the territory drew to an eventual close

An Israeli soldier stands next to signs pointing out distances to different cities, on Mount Bental, an observation post in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights on Thursday
An Israeli soldier stands next to signs pointing out distances to different cities, on Mount Bental, an observation post in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights on Thursday

Israel stationed hundreds of soldiers in the Golan Heights in May after Iranian troops in Syria launched a series of missile strikes 

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